WHERE THE ROAD GOES…

MOGUL'S ON PARADE
MOGHULS ON PARADE

Normally, I’ve been reluctant to besiege My Reader with facts, that particular part of my art researching profession that requires accuracy closely bordering the edge of boredom. However, just this once and feeling safe in the “historical fact” arena because I’ve taken liberal liberties with wording and comments…the curious art researcher and enquiring mind bubbled over and had me dancing in the Aisle of Show and Tell. Let us begin and plow through this somewhat fractured-fiction together. I have, of course, left out the boring bits.

Leave it to King Offa of Mercia to reference the city of Bexelei, East Sussex, England in a charter granted in 772 AD. Such a long time ago, and such a kidder King Offa…he meant the entire area from what is now Hastings, East Sussex, England, to as far as he could see and beyond. Which as we all know was all the land he couldn’t see and then some…, which happens to include the city we know today as Bexhill.

1066 AD   Bexhill was destroyed by pesky Normans in their conquest to rule all they could see and all the land they couldn’t see which commonly included…everything. A definite sign of the time: more is always better.

1086 AD  King William I gave away Bexhill and surrounds to Robert, Count of Eu which included his heirs and, all the hares that surrounded the surrounds. Yes, I’m sure.

There ensued an enormous wadge of time when begetting and begetting took place (both heirs and hares) until  1561 AD when the honourable Queen Elizabeth I gave Bexhill to her good friend and confidant Sir Thomas Sackville, Earl of Dorset. This kept the Sackville Earl and Duke heirs (and hares) quite busy until the mid-19th Century.

1804   brought King George III’s German Legion troops to Bexhill to fight any French invaders linked with Napoleon and any French hares (or heirs) wanting to rule…yes…everything and everywhere.

The quaint English custom of inheriting an entire area of a country which included even the pastry shops which I’m quite fond of, but I digress…left Bexhill in 1865 in the hands of the lovely Elizabeth Sackville and her husband the 5th Earl De La War due to a shortage of other heirs, but not hares.

My Reader has advised me to skip years of boring facts because of the several yawns and snores emitted from the back rows, so I’ll just jump to the here and now:

The De La War’s played a huge part in the development and modernization of Bexhill, and in the city building planning scheme evident even today. Having been duly anointed, by King Edward VII as an Incorporated Borough in 1901, the city became a posh seafront resort destination for the gentry of London and surrounding areas. Years and years of begatters and begetters, who had the station and finery to partake and parade did so. More is good. Money is even better.

The Central Parade seafront, which included the Marina Court, was built between 1903-1907 to the designs of Durwood Brown and other creative architects. Buildings were constructed in the MOGHUL INDIAN style: structures with distinctive ornate domes; corner turrets; and decorative arches. Exotic onion roofs with decorative chimneys shouted seaside character unlike the popular Georgian architectural building styles of neighbouring Brighton to the east, and Eastbourne to the west.

Imagine My Reader and I taking great delight in discovering these wonderful artifices on a day trip from St. Leonards-on-Sea to Bexhill.

Where the road goes…

Who knew?

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58 thoughts on “WHERE THE ROAD GOES…

    1. aFa…I’m already practicing another routine…not like our last one but more like in the video. You, too? I would hope! Please don’t be offended, Frank….but I’d like to wear the dress this time.
      xoxRRR

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  1. At first glance, I would have placed the onion domes in Eastern Europe/Russia… but upon closer inspection, I noticed the characteristic English clay chimney caps to the left of the domes. I am glad to have the factiods about English gentry possessing all that they can see. Of course, this attitude usually lead to over-expansion of ones, or one’s government’s, over-reach of what he (or she, or it) could actually adminster, and therefore downfall over time. We see our own empire-minded 1% mogels and super-power leaders doing the same today… then there is Google and Facebook, which seem to have no limits to what they can see and control. (Data-mine that WordPress! Howdy, NSA watchers!).
    Oscar

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    1. Ahh…you are absolutely correct, Oscar, in noticing the chimney pots perched atop those onion domes. Much like King George III’s sight-lines…chimney pots in England remain just that…everywhere, everywhere…like birds-on-a-wire. Grins to your side from my side. Raye

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  2. It is hard to believe the inspiration for this lay on the English coastline…and thanks for taking us on this colorful trip of discovery ~ Bexhill, now I know 🙂

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      1. I always say these days that it is nice getting lost, as I find there is often more to be found in these “new” places. Wish you a great coming week Raye ~ Cheers!

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  3. Ha! These buildings are truly in England!? I read the whole thing because I wanted to know if you really were going to continue about the hares. There are too many here. I call them Giant Fort Wayne Ninja Bunnies.
    Interesting history, though, Jots. I so enjoy reading your posts.

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    1. Leslie, I am so late getting my response to you. Yes, surprise, surprise architecture…on the south coast. Go figure. I do believe, however, the Victorians went through an “Oriental” stage of everythingness…where they just couldn’t get enough of it! That should be another post…..looks like my art researching has yet to hit its peak! Thank you always for stopping by. R.

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    1. What a surprise to see this type of architecture at the English seaside! Sometimes you just have to draw/paint what you have to draw/paint! You know what I mean…

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  4. I purposefully waited to read this post because I wanted to read your Readers’ comments (which almost always mirror my own but which are way more entertaining that mine would be).

    I, too, would have done much better in art history (or any history for that matter) had my teacher(s) had half your wit and way with sharing!

    Love! DMLR xoxo

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    1. In the process of writing a rap for 100 5th graders coming to Portland to hear the OR Symphony orchestra perform a youth concert program. A school visit. When done will email you…haven’t forgotten that “inspiring writers” piece to send you. We’ll talk soon 😊! Xxoo RRR

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          1. *Snort* all you like… Raye-Beam (gave you a new rapper name…’coz you know, just Raye won’t cut it!)

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      1. No. Not that I’ve been napping…just a bit distracted today. Memorizing a “rap” I composed for 100 fifth graders who are coming to Portland to hear the Symphony orchestra perform a youth concert program. You, Dearest aFa, are such a Wordsmith! Love double entendre of “peeling” comment. I keep thinking that you are amazing…and I keep being right! Hey…cold enough for you yet? Thinking about you as usual…RRR

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        1. Oh yes … I saw that you’ve been rapping … hope it goes well – and I can’t imagine why it won’t. Yikes … a double entendre? Wow … sounds kinky … cheers to Wild Thing.

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          1. Well, if it makes you feel better, I totally agree with Raye that you are a wonderful wordsmith. Feel better?

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  5. Dearest Professor,
    Would you consider this as an appropriate subtitle? … On the Road to the Onion Bulbs of Bexhill…. must have been the onions that created thoughts of peeling. …. have a good week ahead.

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  6. Dear Professor Jots, I would have taken Art History 101, over and over had it been spread out such as this. Good shtufffs.

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  7. Sackville is a town in New Brunswick! And you thought I wasn’t paying attention…..
    I would have liked history class better in school if it was so beautifully illustrated.

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  8. My travels have yet to take me across the sea, but thanks to you and your marvelous painting and intricate historical summary, I can go without the fear of jetlag or baggage fees.

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  9. Lovely! I do love your artworks…and the history lesson. I would only add that your King George had a habit of giving large tracks of land (which he could not see but which he claimed as his own) to his friends and loyal personages, and their heirs and hares, over here in the colonies. There are still many places on this side of the pond that have ties back to his generosity.

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  10. OK.. Time to dust off the magic carpet and fly! Hmmm… dust.. cough… On second thought, I’d better keep mending or I’ll negate the progress of getting well! Hold those tickets – Magic Carpet Airlines will be making a Watercolors-optional flight there very soon!! (Of course I loved the watercolor, and — lucky stars — the entire page loaded!) Z

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  11. I’ve been to Brighton several times, but missed Bexhill. I’ll have to put it on my bucket list!

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    1. Mr. B. It is those out-of-the-way places that almost always have the best surprises! Those onion tops certainly were…so out of character for this little sea coast village. Always nice to see you here. Thank you, Barney.

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